KATEMIDDLETONAPKIRSTYWIGGLESWORTH

Moms-to-be: Forget how Kate Middleton looked

PHOTO: Kate Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William are all smiles as they take their newborn princess, Charlotte Elizabeth Diana, home from the hospital.  |  Kirsty Wigglesworth~AP

Listen up, all you moms-to-be.

I’ve got some news you probably don’t want to hear, but I’m going to share it anyway. Here it is: more than likely you will not look anything like Kate Middleton did after childbirth.

As we all have heard and marveled at, the Duchess of Cambridge gave birth two hours after arriving at St. Mary’s Hospital in London on Saturday (May 2) to a daughter named Charlotte Elizabeth Diana. And then, just a mere 10 hours after delivery, the duchess walked out of the hospital looking like a million bucks.

She was wearing a delicate yellow-and-white number that flowed from the waist and heels. Her face was fully made up and her long brown hair was blown out to perfection.

How did this happen? (If you ask me the real question is why did the poor thing have to be so dolled up.) Well, all the stories online talk about Team Kate, and if you have the finances to have a team when you are giving birth, that team more than likely includes a hairstylist and makeup artist as well as someone adept at stuffing a person’s unwilling body into clothing, AKA a stylist.

Instead of feeling discouraged because you know you won’t be looking like that, be glad that you don’t have to do like Kate. (Poor thing.) This is your chance to dial it down and be comfortable, all for a good reason: you are the mother of a brand-new baby!

There’s a good chance your feet — and other parts — will still be puffy. More than likely — unless you are a glutton for punishment — you’ll be coming home in something from your recent maternity wardrobe. But hey, it’ll be roomier. Plan for comfortable shoes.

If you get to wash your hair and remembered to bring a brush, chances are your hair will look OK.

All that isn’t important. What is important is the well-being of your infant and yourself. Most likely someone will tell you what to do for your baby. Yourself? Not as likely. Just remember to get as much sleep as you can when you can.

Don’t rely on fast foods. You just had a baby; your body needs to recoup. Good nutrition helps that happen. Get someone — your partner, a good friend, mom or another relative — to prepare food for you. And not just meals: if someone asks, “What can I do?” tell them to cut up vegetables and fruits for you and separate them into containers. Or, to make you some hard-boiled eggs and leave them in the frig. All foods that’ll make eating quickly and nutritiously possible.

If someone is there at mealtime, let him make you scrambled eggs; tell them to toss in some cheese and serve them along with those chopped-up veggies and you’ve got a nutritious meal in no time.

Nuts are another good and easy source of protein. Yogurt, cheese and milk help increase your calcium, something especially important if you will be breastfeeding. Canned albacore tuna is another good thing to have on hand because it’s convenient and rich in omega-3s.

A newborn demands a lot of attention. Make sure you’re eating right and getting whatever rest you can so you will be up for the little one’s needs.